Aircraft Management Services – You Need the Best

Not all aircraft management services are alike. While most will offer the basic services you will need, there are those who go a bit above and beyond the basics. Before deciding which company to use, find out all you can about them–and if they are able to provide what you want, instead of you having to settle for the standard services they offer. Remember, you have choices. And it is important to explore all of them before signing any agreements.

Things to Keep in Mind as You Search for an Aircraft Management Company

* How long has the company been in business? Startup companies can give you good rates, but they won’t have the experience you may require.

* What services other than the basics do they offer? Some extras will cost a bit more, but if they are important to you to have, it will be a good investment. Aircraft ownership is not inexpensive, to say the least, and pinching pennies when it comes to upkeep and other services makes no sense. Of course, you do want to make sure you are getting a fair rate.

* Make a list of the services and options you would like to have, along with a list of what you will not do without. This can help you narrow down the possibilities when deciding which company to use for your aircraft management needs.

* What are the qualifications of the staff they employ? All employees involved with your plane should be certified for whatever job it is they hold. Any company with less than complete professionals on their staff should not be used.

* What is their safety record? This is important, since the better the safety record, the safer your aircraft will be. Do a little digging and you will not regret it.

For the most part, the companies you are considering should have a record of their current and past clients, and what they have to say about the company in question. Ask for referrals before making your decision to be sure you will have the best experience possible.

Facilities and Services to Consider When Making Your Decision

* Heated hangar space

* Insurance against accident or other problems which may occur at competitive rates

* Supplemental or regular staffing availability such as flight crew that are fully trained and rated

* Dispatch services and flight schedule access for aircraft owners

There may be cases where you will want to make your aircraft available for charter services through the management company. Full accounting disclosure and the highest rate for aircraft owners would be necessary to look for in this endeavor. Choosing an aircraft management service that has fully qualified pilots and flight teams to run the charter flight can actually help to defray the costs of ownership of the aircraft.

Since the aircraft itself can be such a large initial investment, it only makes sense to protect that investment with the right aircraft management services for your needs. The corporate owned services may seem like the best option, but for flexibility in working with plane owners, a smaller, dependable company is the best bet.

Knowing The Relevance of Fixed Base Operators on Commercial Airports

For the uninitiated, FBO stands for Fixed Base Operator – a term that’s extremely relevant in both the general and commercial aviation sectors. The aviation industry is propelled by a number of companies and service providers, many of which are focused on helping different parties with vested interests. FBO basically cater to the needs of general aviation, and depending on their profile, they may work with commercial carriers and other individual companies that require on-airport services. In this post, we will talk about FBOs and how their services are important and pertinent for the sector.

The need for FBO

It is very hard to generalize the scope of work done by Fixed Base Operators, primary because their roles at different airports can vary tremendously. They are, however, extremely important to the aviation customers they serve. As mentioned, an FBO may choose to work with a regular commercial airline, or they might be involved in airport maintenance as approved by the airport sponsor along with the overseeing regulatory authority. FBOs are important because they provide a critical service, the supply of aviation fuels, at the airports they serve. Their services help in maintaining standards and services at an airport, and they can serve commercial carriers as well as the general aviation public. Many FBOs are described as full service, meaning they provide additional services such as Maintenance Repair and Overhaul (MRO) and Aircraft Charter and Management (ACM) in addition to the core FBO services of aircraft handling, fueling and hangaring. It largely depends on the nature of the airport and local demand for services.

Things to expect

FBOs serve in different roles. Almost all FBOs provide the core line services of aircraft handling, fueling and hangaring. Most also provide facilities with amenities for the flying public and flight crews, including general aviation terminals with customer service desks and seating areas, flight planning and pilot lounges and rest areas, and other amenities. When it comes to commercial services, FBOs at many regional airports will provide commercial handling and fueling where there is not enough commercial service to rise to the level of a stand-alone third party provider. Although somewhat less frequent, FBO personnel can also provide some above wing services such as passenger ticketing, check in and gate agent services.

Working with a FBO

If you are an airport sponsor or someone who needs assistance with airport businesses, you should be careful about how you choose the best FBO management service. Expertise and experience matter the most in this sector, given that the cost of operations is getting higher as demand for higher service levels and better facilities continues to increase. You need a team that knows your business goals and can offer dedicated assistance with complex aviation logistics. As a prospective client, you should carefully diligence their experience and capabilities, and you should always be able to contact their references. FBOs are great at overcoming operational challenges, but working with the right service provider who understands your needs and meets your expectations is critical.

Check online now to find the best FBOs in business.

Quick Guide to The Basic Services Offered by Fixed-Based Operators

Like any other industry, the aviation services sector is propelled by a number of specific functions. In North America and parts of Europe, the concept of Fixed-Based Operator (FBO) services is understood to consist of certain components. So what’s a FBO? What kind of services do they offer? In this post, we will discuss these attributes and more.

What are Fixed-Based Operator (FBO) services?

To understand the services provided by FBOs, it is important to understand the process of entering an airport and using general aviation. FBOs provide a welcoming, private general aviation terminal for those passengers flying in general aviation aircraft. Unlike their commercial counterparts, there are no security lines or lengthy check in procedures. Instead, the FBO staff assists the flight crew for the general aviation airplane to prepare the plane for departure. This can consist of handling (moving) the airplane from the hangar or ramp standing area to the terminal for departure, as well as fueling the airplane and provisioning the airplane with sundries and other specific requests of the passengers (such as catering, other cabin supplies, etc. Since the passengers are known to the flight crews and the flight crews and the passengers are known to the FBOs, the boarding process is very fast and efficient. FBO personnel assist the flight crews in expeditiously helping the passengers board the aircraft, assisting with baggage stowage and ensuring any other pre-flight requirements are met.

What additional services do FBOs provide?

Pretty much everything needed by the flight crew or passengers. They are responsible for the facilities through which general aviation flights take place. These include hangar facilities at most airports and general aviation passenger terminals and other facilities. Within the definition of general aviation facilities, the FBO ensures that the flight crew can do their flight planning, check the weather and do all of the necessary preparation for the aircraft and passengers. The FBO also provides areas for the flight crew to rest and relax when they not actively preparing for a flight. Depending upon the airport and local regulations, passengers themselves may use the facilities for staging before a flight or they may be driven or escorted out directly to the aircraft by the FBO staff.

What other services do FBOs provide?

The short answer is whatever the passengers and flight crews need for a successful trip. Often this includes arranging or providing ground transportation for the passengers and crew, whether this using a ride hailing service or rental cars or taxis. It can also entail helping passengers with other concierge arrangements, such as booking hotels, finding restaurants, etc. FBOs usually have conference rooms for private meetings and may offer additional facilities for passengers and flight crews as well.

If you would like to learn more about Fixed-Based Operator (FBO) services and FBO management, you can search online to find service providers and management companies. You should diligence their experience and service offerings and ensure that they have the capabilities and capacity to meet your needs.

Everything You Need to Know About Commercial Aircraft Passenger Services

Most large commercial airports deal with numerous challenges each day. Besides the runway traffic, efficient passenger traffic remains one of the major concerns. Commercial carriers need to handle their passenger traffic flow efficiently and economically. Typically, aircraft passenger services are offered either by commercial airlines directly or by airport management companies which work at an airport. In this post, we will examine more detail to understand these services better.

The basics

The process of check-in to departure at a commercial airport has evolved for every passenger and crewmember. Ensuring smooth coordination in this process is extremely critical, not only for the customers but also to allow airport and airline personnel to perform their essential duties. Commercial carriers coordinate with airport management staff and other service providers to streamline passenger flow. These services include:

– Keeping track and maintaining a flow of check-ins, arrivals, and departures. Besides check-ins, such services also include assistance for cancellations and changes in itineraries.

– Support crew and passengers for boarding and de-planning (if required).

– Assuring special help and support for disabled passengers.

– Helping minors, who are unaccompanied by adults or guardians

– Monitoring departure control systems

– Core services required by travelers, such as ticketing and sales at an airport.

– Offering additional assistance for other areas, such as charges for extra baggage.

– Arrival baggage services.

– Special services related to lost baggage.

– Assistance that might be needed additionally by customers in certain situations.

Aircraft passenger services are extremely relevant and necessary for smooth commercial airport operations.

Finding a service provider

The passenger service experience defines and determines the brands of commercial carriers, airport sponsors and management, and other stakeholders, and it’s important to choose an airport management company that understands the complicities and demands of this industry. If you need a professional management company or other on-airport service provider, you should diligence two areas:

1. First, the company should be experienced and must have the infrastructure and capabilities to handle the projects assigned to them. The professional service provider should be able to document a strong track record of proven results and offer references from this experience history.

2. Also, you should review the specific experience of the concerned company. Keep in mind that the concept of professional airport management is different in various parts of the world. Fixed Base Operators (FBOs) serving in this role are more customary in North America and Europe, while other geographical areas use different structures.

Passengers remain the lifeline of the aviation industry, and commercial service providers and airlines have to ensure efficient, value-based services for them. This also ensures smooth and efficient passenger flow at commercial airports.

Critical Airport Lease Areas for Aviation Service Providers

It may sound simple, but understanding (and managing to) the specifics of your airport lease is critical for the airport service provider. Whether you are a Fixed Base Operator (FBO), Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) company or an Aircraft Charter and Management (ACM) company, if you provide direct on-airport service your lease is your not only your life blood and access to your customer base, but it is also a big component of your company’s value.

Aviation service providers generally work under lease directly from the airport itself. Most leases are long term in order to afford the tenant (the aviation FBO, MRO or ACM company) the ability to achieve a return on the investment they must make to establish their business. Leases usually also confer the operating rights and restrictions under which the service provider must operate. Because they have long lives, however, and are not referred to often in the day-to-day provision of airport services, the opportunity for confusion arises and mistakes can compound for months or years until discovered and corrected. There are numerous examples of rent disputes that arose from a misunderstanding of the rent calculation only to compound for years until finally reconciled, many times with the service provider taking a material charge to their profit and loss statement.

1. Rent Calculations. Obviously, most airport tenants are deeply aware of the amount of rent they pay to the airport on a monthly basis, either for ground rent or facilities. Unlike a typical office or other facility lease, however, an airport lease may require additional variable rent payments based upon activities. There are many types and structures but common types of variable rent are fuel flowage fees, a variable rent as a percentage of gross sales, additional rent in the form of recoupment from tenants of fees and taxes an airport incurs, etc. Since these are variable they are typically paid monthly by the tenant but only reconciled annually. Because FBOs typically have the most different lines of businesses, they are especially inclined to have additional variable rent structures. Diligent management and clear communication with the airport (as well as mutually agreed upon reporting tools) are best practices for preventing an unintended consequence from building up on either side of the ledger.

2. Operating Rights & Restrictions. Airport leases typically clearly state which activities a tenant may conduct (or is required to conduct) and activities from which they are prohibited. These categories vary however, from very narrow to quite broad depending upon the intent of the airport; e.g. is the airport trying to tightly manage scarce resources or is it attempting to broadly stimulate growth and employment on the airport. In the modern hurried environment it is easy to contemplate adding a new service or product line without first determining whether that service or product is specifically allowed or prohibited under your current lease. You should always clearly understand your contractual rights and restrictions before making a commitment to a material outlay of resources, especially in the areas of time, personnel and capital.

3. Maintenance & Repair. The maintenance and repair responsibility for your facilities will largely depend on who constructed them and who now holds title to them. In some cases the facilities will be let “where is, as is” and the tenant will be responsible for all maintenance and repair. Other times there are specific levels of maintenance the airport landlord may provide (e.g. “structural”) and the tenant will be responsible for others that do not rise to this level. Open communication with the airport is again the best tool for understanding who is going to pay for the next large repair issue.

4. Lease Premises. Similar to rent, above, this appears straightforward and usually is. An older lease which has been subject to multiple amendments and assignments through multiple owners, however, may be tricky. If you purchased the lease as part of a larger aviation services business and bought title insurance at that time you should have assurance as to the exact location, size and characteristics of the leasehold. If you acquired the lease through other means such as a Request For Proposals process, you should examine the description of the premises in the lease and ensure it is consistent with your understanding and current aviation operations and activity. If there is doubt or ambiguity as to what and where the actual leasehold is, you should seek help understanding exactly what your rights are respective to the leasehold.

5. Transfer and Change of Control. This is another area which can materially affect the value of an aviation service provider’s business. Most leases require a landlord’s (airport’s) consent to transfer a lease (as an asset) via an assignment (although it is common to have exceptions for transfers to entities that are subsidiaries or controlled by the current tenant). A change of control, which occurs when a tenant conveys more than 50% of the underlying interests of the business to another individual or entity, usually also requires a similar consent. This language varies from lease to lease of course and is less common in older leases. You should review this language in your lease and determine the consequences before you begin planning to sell your business as it may have a material impact on your sale process, especially if you are selling only a part of an airport based service business. There are different strategies to use in dealing with these types of provisions, however, and the best practice is to structure your business or sale process taking these provisions into account and aligning the structure of the process to meet your end goals.

Airport leases for Fixed Base Operators (FBOs), Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) companies and Aircraft Charter and Management (ACM) Companies have evolved and become more complex, especially at larger airports, and the aviation infrastructure required to perform these services continues to become more expensive. To maximize your return as an operator, you have to have a complete understanding of one of your most important governing documents, your airport lease.

Starting an Aircraft Washing Business

So you love airplanes and you want to start an aircraft washing service? I cannot blame you, as I did the same thing. After cleaning Thousands of aircraft over the years, I have paid for my flight school, first aircraft and then started an aircraft washing franchise as a module of another franchising company I had founded. Named the Aircraft Wash Guys we learned early on what it takes to satisfy aircraft owners, FBOs Fixed Based Operators and Chief Pilots. We always specialized in washing and polishing aircraft. We’ve cleaned thousands of private planes, corporate jets, flying clubs, flight schools and helicopters. My Car Wash Guys company was originally founded over twenty years ago and started as an aircraft washing service.

As you know, aviation people are serious about flying and a clean plane makes flying more fun and enjoyable. Corporate Aviators need you to maintain their positive image. When in the aircraft washing business you will not only wash exteriors of planes, you must also have carpet-cleaning capabilities. Many of our crewmembers are also private pilots and it pays to have pilots as part of your employee team. To learn more about aircraft washing, I have put some additional ideas online to assist you.

http://www.Aircraftwashguys.com/aircraftbbs

We have always kept our prices low and gone for volume, you may wish to do this or charge the going rate. Our rates are at the lower end of the spectrum and this will give you a good starting point on pricing.

Single Engines $20.00-45.00 wash, waxing $60.00-140.00, weekly wash $20.00;

Twin Engines $45.00-90.00 wash, waxing $90.00-240.00, weekly wash $40.00; Corporate Jets $90.00-140.00 wash, waxing $180.00-400.00, weekly wash $80.00;

Helicopters $30.00-100.00 wash, waxing $45.00-180.00, weekly wash $30.00. Carpet Shampooing, Bright Work and Aluminum Polishing, etc. generally we will give the customers free estimates.

You will need to perform these services the customer’s schedule and usually accommodate, immediate services, day or night, evenings and weekends. Customizing your services with the customer’s requirements must become your specialty. You will also need the following things:

Two Million in Liability Insurance

Quiet Machines and Professional Crews in Uniform

Monthly Invoice by “N”-Number

Water Reclamation Device Onboard, EPA Compliant

Truck or Trailer Mounted Unit, Fully Self Contained, Painted Safety Yellow

Owning an Aircraft Washing Service small business can be quite rewarding and although hard work, it can be an extension of your flying hobby. Just think getting paid to wash some of the latest and greatest aircraft and hanging out at the airport all day? And yes, they will even pay you very well for doing just that. Think on this.

All About FBO and Aircraft Handling Services

The aviation industry is served by many service companies, but Fixed Base Operators or FBOs are of particular importance for private and commercial carriers. In this post, we will talk about FBOs in detail and understand some of their services and roles in the current industry.

The essential services

As the name suggests, FBOs and aircraft handling services offer fixed infrastructure and a wide range of different facilities at an airport. These facilities can be really diverse, from managing terminals and passenger services to immigration, aircraft fueling and maintenance services. The range of services offered by these companies depends largely on the size and location. In places like the Middle East, India and China these services are still developing at a rapid rate, while in Europe and North America FBOs already do prominent jobs at most airports.

Understanding aircraft handling services

Some FBOs do offer aircraft handling services, although such services can be provided by third parties as well. A ground handler usually has a direct license from the airport from which to offer these services. This may include both above and below wing services (discussed further in this post). Airport handling services are critical because these offer help and assistance with ground support equipment. Ground handlers must carry significant liability insurance and must have proper safety training in the field. In most countries they also need additional certification from different authorities.

Above and below wing services

“Above Wing” services are all about assisting the crew and passengers to and from the aircraft. This may include handling passengers at the airport, along with other services like transportation to the aircraft, in-flight catering and managing accommodation at hotels if needed. FBOs also manage concierge services to serve the passenger requirements of those using private aircraft. On the other hand, “Below Wing” services involve actual ground handling work, including baggage handling, towing, and coordinating with other parties for fueling, hangar and other services. Many of the companies also offer additional essential services, such as the supply of certain equipment such as tugs, ground power units and other equipment.

Other important areas

If you are a private aircraft owner and require FBO services, you need to find a company that has extensive experience in the field. You need to know the depth of experience they have providing FBO services and their current capabilities and capacities. For FBO services, it’s important to have a company that specializes in the field and has worked at major airports in America. You might also want to know their experience in the international arena, especially when you need to specifically plan for international operations.

Over the years, the demand for FBOs has increased considerably, although the roles can differ in different countries. These companies perform the technical requirements and handle other issues at major airports and streamline the work in a professional way, both for flight crews and passengers. Some of the FBOs even work with airport sponsors and other parties to manage and handle specific projects.

Pilot Hearing Loss and Tips for Protecting Your Ears

Hearing loss caused by noise is a huge problem for all pilots and flight instructors, especially those who fly small aircraft. Think about it: Day after day, flight after flight, pilots are subjected to a constant din from the engines, exhaust, propeller, fuselage and other areas. And unlike other noisy professions, pilots are generally subjected to the same noise frequency and intensity for extended periods of time. Here are some important things to know about noise fatigue, and how you can help prevent long-term hearing loss.

While noise fatigue is a health issue for all pilots, small aircraft, especially turboprop planes, are generally noisier and less insulated than large commercial jet aircraft. Even if you fly a larger aircraft with a quieter interior, you are probably exposed to ambient noise from the tarmac or in the cockpit with the cabin door open. Most noise inside and around the aircraft are from four main areas:

  1. Noise from the exhaust stacks (especially short stacks) usually located directly beneath the cabin, and the subsequent airflow pushing up against the bottom of the fuselage
  2. The propeller and airflow off the propeller against the windshield
  3. Airflow through vents, leaks around doors and turbulence throughout the fuselage
  4. Engine noise, especially the vibration of air-cooled engines

Average Everyday Decibel Levels

The decibel (dB) is the unit used to measure sound intensity. To give you an idea of ​​the average decibel level of some everyday sounds, consider the following:

  • A whisper – 30 dB
  • A quiet room – 40 dB
  • Normal conversation – 60 dB
  • Busy traffic – 70 dB
  • Gas lawn mower – 106 dB
  • Jackhammer – 130 dB
  • Jet engine – 140 dB

Keep in mind that permanent hearing damage can occur from sounds louder than 85 dB, physical pain occurs at around 125 dB, and an eardrum may burst at 140 dB. The Occupational Safety and Health Organization (OSHA) states that the maximum level of "safe" exposure to loud sounds is 90 dB for up to eight hours, or 100 dB for up to two hours. OSHA requires that workers exposed to noise levels higher than 85 dB must use hearing protection equipment.

Study on Aircraft Noise Levels

In 2010, an Occupational Health & Safety study entitled, "Interior Sound Levels in General Aviation Aircraft" sought to determine if prolonged exposure to interior aircraft noise is a health hazard for pilots.

For the study, sound samples were taken in a Cessna 172 and a Piper PA-44 Seminole – two planes with different airframes. While the planes were in flight, two sound-level meters took readings from within an occupant's headset, as well ambient noise from the cabin, to get an idea of ​​true noise levels without any hearing protection.

To simulate a "worst flying day scenario," the researchers tested for eight-hour exposure, and created an eight-hour time weighted average from the sound sample readings. The time-weighted average for all of the aircraft cabin measurements came in at 86.26 dBA. The study's data reinforced that pilots are indeed exposed to sound levels higher than OSHA standards. The study also determined that the use of a headset is adequate hearing protection for a projected eight-hour period. Read the full study . To get an idea of ​​the decibel level inside your aircraft, buy a decibel meter at an electronics store and (safely) take readings during the climb, cruise and descent. Keep in mind the dB level inside your headphones should be lower than the ambient, unprotected noise level in the cockpit and cabin.

Tips for Protecting Your Ears

If the ambient noise level inside your cockpit reaches 90 dBA, you should be using hearing protection equipment. A good set of headsets are essential, especially if in-cockpit noise levels exceed OSHA exposure limits. Active noise reduction headsets are recommended because they improve signal-to-noise ratios and enhance sound quality. Another benefit of a quality headset is that they reduce high-frequency background noise, making speech signals clearer and easier to understand. For maximum protection, combine a good set of active noise reduction headsets with earplugs. Another good tip is to limit your exposure to loud activities before flying, such as mowing the lawn or listening to loud music.

If You Have Symptoms of Hearing Loss …

Some symptoms of hearing loss include difficulty understanding what people are saying, listening to TV and music at loud levels and avoiding social interactions because hearing is frustrating. Prolonged exposure to loud noises and unchecked hearing damage can also cause irritability, lack of focus, high blood pressure, increased stress levels, insomnia and high or abnormal heart rate.

If you suspect you are suffering from hearing loss and its side effects, see your doctor and / or get checked by a qualified otolaryngologist or audiologist to find out the extent of the hearing damage, if any, and what you can do to treat it.

Cessna 182 – Tips for a Smooth Transition

One of the first upgrades most pilots face is the one from basic training aircraft to something with a bit more performance and complexity. At one time the common transition was from a Cessna 152 to a Cessna 172, or from Piper Tomahawk to Piper Warrior. As those very basic aircraft disappeared from training inventories for a few years, it became much more common to start off in a 172 or something similar, pushing the first transition to a more complex aircraft such as the Cessna 182.

According to the FAA, the 182, with an engine of over 200 horsepower, is considered a high performance aircraft. To fly a high performance aircraft the FAA requires you log ground and flight instruction with a certified flight instructor (CFI). Though the amount of time is not specified by the FAA, instructors commonly indicate around 5 to 10 hours as the amount of time required- though that may vary significantly based on a student’s background and experience.

While the 182 is classified as a high performance aircraft, it does not fit in the complex category. Though it has two of the three requirements (flaps, constant speed prop, retractable gear), its fixed landing gear means it’s not considered a complex aircraft.

Though the FAA may not consider the 182 complex, beginning students may think differently. As mentioned, the 182 adds a constant speed prop and cowl flaps to the already familiar controls. More weight means different handling techniques, and a bigger engine means more attention has to be paid to its management. Overall, these additional elements give more weight to the importance of following checklist procedures.

As far as what the new controls mean, the prop RPM will be controlled by the blue knob. The throttle will go from controlling the RPM as in a 172 to controlling the manifold pressure. Most of the time in the 182, ground ops, takeoff and landing will be with the prop control pushed all of the way in. That will give you the most power available. In cruise flight though, that setting isn’t very efficient, so you’ll bring the blue knob back to a slower RPM, which will have the propeller taking a bigger bite out of the air. The settings for RPM and manifold pressure vary slightly from one model of 182 to the next, so consult the POH for your particular aircraft for the exact numbers.

When adjusting the engine controls the inevitable question will arise as to which control to move first. The easiest way to remember is that the blue knob will stay in more than the throttle. So, when you want to increase power, lead with the prop control. When reducing power (as in leveling off), lead with the throttle.
Bigger engines tend to foul more easily than their smaller counterparts- meaning the proper leaning technique must be adhered to. Proper technique is to lean during taxing and in cruise flight. On the ground it’s usually sufficient to pull the mixture out an inch or so or just a bit before the engine coughs. In cruise you can lean by fuel flow or cylinder head temperatures based on the equipment in your aircraft. Check the POH for detailed instructions.

The cowl flaps are another thing to remember. They control the amount of cooling air flowing over the engine. Cooling air is good when it’s hot or you’re slow or on the ground; but it increases drag the rest of the time. For the 182 the cowl flaps will remain open until you reach cruise flight, then they can be closed. They will usually remain closed until landing. As in all cases, follow the checklist.

As for handling, the 182 is heavier in both roll and pitch than a 172. Pitch will be the first notable difference as you’re rolling down the runway for takeoff and realize that it will take a decided pull to get the nose moving up. That same characteristic will come into play on landing as it will take a conscious effort to keep the nose wheel up longer than the mains. Proper trim, which is more important in heavier planes, will minimize this effect. You should be trimming for hands off flight at all times. There are many 182’s that have suffered bent firewalls in testament to the importance of a good flare and proper trim.

The Cessna 182 is nothing to be intimidated by. It’s not much more difficult to fly than a 172, with the addition of some checklist items to keep in mind. After a few hours you will come to enjoy the increased speed, range and stability that it will give you.

Understanding Aviation Maintenance Repair and Overhaul (MRO) Management Better

The aviation industry is growing at a substantial rate, which certainly is good news for stakeholders, from passengers and airport sponsors to institutional investors and aviation service providers. Of course, the industry runs on services in many different segments, and one of the major services provided is MRO, or Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul.

In this post, we will describe the kind of work that these service providers offer with regards to aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul management, and why this sector matters for operational success.

The need for MRO services

Regardless of the location, facilities and other services offered at an airport, the aviation industry depends on one major aspect – operational aircraft. Aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul management is all about aircraft servicing and management. Commercial airlines and private operators prefer to delegate maintenance tasks to specialized companies offering aviation maintenance. These companies have the necessary operational expertise and experience and also have a great depth of capabilities through their training, tooling and authorizations. These services are critical as projecting and managing maintenance schedules will determine whether aircraft will be operational and available to meet their mission requirements. With today’s increasing demand, MRO service providers are pertinent, necessary, and extremely relevant to keep aircraft and their passengers moving on schedule.

What do MRO management services offer?

As MRO service providers grow, the need for professional management increases as well. In most cases, maintenance and repair work is dependent upon a number of different requirements and regulations, and the nature of contracts with end users varies considerably. Owners and operators are focused on cost control, quality, and minimizing the downtime of their assets. They also seek to source more services from single source providers, e.g. MRO companies with a breadth of capabilities and authorizations which allows for more services to be provided during a single maintenance event.

Demand for aviation MRO services is driven by mandatory maintenance, which occur on fixed flight hour, time-based or activity based intervals. The combination of an aging fleet coupled with increasing utilization underpins the increasing demand forecast for the next 5-10 years. The need for aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul management will continue to increase, and as aircraft utilization continues to grow the need for such services will become more prominent in years to come. Consequently, it is important to choose a company that has the necessary experience and expertise for your particular maintenance requirements to meet your mission profile and keep your aircraft and passengers moving.