Aircraft Hydraulic Accumulators

Aerospace hydraulic accumulators.

Aircraft hydraulic accumulators are components in hydraulic systems that allow a noncompressible fluid, such as oil, to be stored under pressure. An accumulator has two compartments separated by a flexible or movable partition such as a diaphragm, bladder, or piston. One compartment contains compressed air or nitrogen, and the other is connected into the source of hydraulic pressure.

Aircraft strut servicing equipment.

When oil is pumped into the accumulator, portable charging units or PCUs are used. The partition moves over and increases the pressure of the air. This air pushing against the partition holds pressure on the oil. Hydraulic accumulators in an aircraft hydraulic system act as shock absorbers and provide a source of additional hydraulic power when heavy demands are placed on the system. The maintenance equipment is known generally as aircraft strut servicing equipment.

Accumulator air preload refers to the charge of compressed air or nitrogen in one side of an accumulator. The air preload is normally about one third of the system hydraulic pressure and there is good market for low pressure strut charging kits. When fluid is pumped into the oil side of the accumulator, the air is further compressed, and the air pressure and the fluid pressure become the same. If the air preload pressure is too low, there will be almost no time between the regulator reaching its kick-in and kick-out pressures, and the system will cycle far more frequently than it should. If there is no air pressure gauge on the accumulator, the amount of air preload may be found by watching the hydraulic system pressure gauge as the pressure is slowly bled off the system. The pressure will drop slowly, until a point is reached at which it drops suddenly. This point is the air preload pressure.

Strut/accumulator inflate/deflate tools will now allow aircraft service personnel to achieve accurate setting of aircraft strut pressures. Accurate settings will ensure smoother take-off and landings are achieved and will minimise both aircraft and tyre damage.

Hydraulic equipment repair and pnematic equipment repair.

Hydraulic systems need to generally to be maintained, serviced, and adjusted in accordance with:manufacturers’ maintenance manuals and permanent component maintenance manuals. Hydraulic lines and fittings should be carefully inspected at regular intervals to insure airworthiness. Any evidence of fluid loss or leaks, loose anchorages, scratches, kinks, or other damage should be scrupulously managed, replaced or repaired. The role of the military or civil ground support equipment custom designer should not be underestimated.

Private Jet Detailing And Aircraft Cleaning Entrepreneurs Have Good News For 2017

The general aviation sector has been in the doldrums for quite a while. Some blame this on increased FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) regulations, much of which occurred after 9-11 to protect airports from potential terrorists, unfortunately these increased security requirements and increased regulations have stifled the general aviation (GA) sector. The economic crashes of 2000 and 2008 didn’t help, although in 2003 the economy was flying high thanks to Bush Tax Cuts and stimulus, then it hit a wall again and didn’t really do well until the run-up just before the 2008 crash.

The GA sector has only slightly recovered since then but not back to its 2003 highs. When Obama got elected he railed against Corporate Jets and Corporate Fat Cats which hurt jet sales and new aircraft sales. Remember when congress went after the Auto Makers for flying their corporate jets to Washington DC to beg for bailouts? Public sentiment against GA was at an all-time low.

All of this had hurt aircraft cleaners and jet detailers – it made it tough to make money, but it looks like things are changing and the number of GA Aircraft is increasing. This new Trump Administration is pro-Aviation unlike the Obama Administration. Cutting corporate taxes will also help GA and jet sales. It looks like clear skies ahead for those in the General Aviation services business.

There was a great article in AIN – Aircraft International News – December Edition titled; “UBS Bizjet Index Sees Post-election Surge,” by Chad Trautvetter posted on December 12, 2016 which noted the following facts; The new Trump Administration in the U.S. is widely seen as a positive, with 61 percent of those surveyed expecting the outcome of the U.S. presidential election to ultimately be positive for the business jet market, while 11 percent don’t see a positive impact and 28 percent are uncertain.

In fact the article went on to note that there was an increase of between 44-49% increased orders for private jets over last year. Many of those aircraft will be delivered by 2018, and the backlog will increase used aircraft sales and current new inventory. More aircraft certainly means more aircraft to clean and more new aircraft means more corporate detailing customers as well. Meanwhile, along with the fractional jet market, we see jet air-taxi services on the increase as well as Uber style aircraft ride-sharing plans smaller companies can buy into. All of this means the GA sector is ready to take off again and that’s good for business.

Aircraft Custom Kitting Services

Aircraft custom kitting services is all about providing a range of options to meet a range of requirements, using worldwide sourcing experience to provide a single source of supply. Certified quality management under an as9120 quality control system when providing aircraft spares preload kits means that a customer is billed from one single source but can choose a variety of solutions to an unpredictable eventuality.

Assembling Base and Line Station Kits and preload consumable kits to satisfy the end user is a skill, clearly more than just second guessing, but it does control the price and provide a level of accuracy essential for customer satisfaction with automated cost efficiency. It removes the expense of inventory management, logistics and documentation.

QEC kits

– Quick Engine Change QEC kits are a collection of components and accessories installed into a bare engine to reduce the time required for installation of the entire powerplant onto an aircraft.

– QEC kits are one of three things, basic neutral or full.

– Basic QEC kits include all major parts and accessories required for an engine test.

– Neutral QEC kits are in-between and comprise the basic kit plus sufficient parts and accessories to allow installation on an airframe. They are not airframe specific.

– Full QEC kits are the neutral kit plus airframe specific items.

On wing component replacement

Engine maintenance has evolved. On-wing component replacement or in situ repair constitutes a huge saving.

Monitoring data has made it possible to anticipate a fix that can be done on wing before a problem causes engine removal. Damage can be environmental or unexpected and techniques referred to as diagnostics and prognostics are in development to further support identification of timely on-wing intervention.

New techniques are coming along all the time which make the work to certified standards more practicable on wing. The use of advanced composites for engine components, for example, requires a different set of repair techniques to those used on traditional materials in the workshop environment.

The History of the Aircraft Wash Guys, Part Three

As we study this grass roots history of a franchise company in the making we see how opportunity in the market grows companies and how entrepreneurial thinkers take advantage of those opportunities to deliver goods and services, which match the desires of the market place. In this review of the history of the aircraft wash guys we see the company diversifying and finding other niches to serve, some of which were actually better than the original plan. This is very common and typical of entrepreneurial from the ground up companies, yet all to often government regulators and rules fail to see how real companies come to be. This study shows similarities to many of the humble beginnings. If you look at Walt Disney who started in a shed behind the studio or Apple’s jobs in the garage or even Bill Gates and his car counting machine you can see how things grow and build and entrepreneurs find and exploit niches. Now back to our story of the History of the Aircraft Wash Guys Part III:

Mr. Winslow decided after all the research that it was time to go for it; time to launch the franchise company on his own without any venture capital. He planned to build the business the way we had always done it, out of gross receipts. He kept building the business washing cars and aircraft and renamed it The Car Wash Guys. He built up car wash guys to 35 units serving 43 cities using independent contractors. In 1996 he decided to become an actual franchise company, forming Car Wash Guys International, Inc. He could now better control consistency, color schemes and service quality, driving on the comments of Ray Kroc in his book “Grinding it Out”.

Coming from aviation into automotive services he tended to run our business strictly by the book. In aviation things are more critical than in the automotive sector, but he believed that being overly concerned with the little details would actually be a good thing and advantage over the competition when dealing with cars. During the “.Com” craze he changed the name to WashGuy.com and added web sites for the different brand names. Of course Aircraft Wash Guys has always been the favorite of Mr. Winslow since this is where he started out some 27 years ago. After the successes and hardships of the learning all the other different market segments for Team Wash Guys, it was wonderful to offer Aircraft Wash Guys as a completely separate Franchise Module to those people involved in aviation who would like to own their own business.

Wash Guys wash cars, trucks, boats, concrete and many other things and as you are probably aware, aircraft washing requires different training, soaps, equipment and wastewater recovery for environmental reasons. The FAA will with hold monies for aircraft improvements if airports are not following strict environmental laws. It is for this reason Mr. Winslow has been so proactive in helping the team with environmental compliance and giving his expertise to government agencies who are developing BMPs for the Aviation Industry.

In 1997 Lance Winslow met and hired Arthur Dickey the originator of Tidy Plane to work in product development. Trying to better a product called Dry Wash, using kerosene as the active ingredient. Tidy car tried to market Tidy Plane, but that didn’t work to well without Arthur’s devotion. Arthur helped the company design labels and with the help of his chemist design better products which were safe for the aviation cleaning industry working actually out of Lance’s garage. Arthur was one of the original Tidy Car Franchisees, his dad once owned a small airline in Los Angeles, which flew jets and later had one of the top performing Mail Boxes Etc. franchises. Tidy Car made Arthur stop his Tidy Plan Concept, through a franchise agreement clause feeling it did not work with their brand name. A decade Later Tidy Car sold that brand name to Ziebart. Arthur’s brother operated the Tidy Car Franchise after that and did lots of aircraft washing for jet customers in Florida. Arthur was hired away from the founder’s of the Paxton Super Charger, and the Paxton Racing Team after he had developed their super wax brand to sell in Wal-Mart and Pep Boys, after Arthur left the brand never did reach it’s full potential. Arthur with all this knowledge made it easy for us to comply with all the MSDS requirements. Arthur after developing the companies product line moved on to explore other opportunities and continued his passion with the Dry Washing Concept and with a friend convinced Fed Ex to use it exclusively in many markets and he set up with some associates a network of operators using his new blend.

In 2000 Mr. Winslow gave a notice to all Car Wash Guys stating it was forbidden for them to wash planes due to potential negative PR in newspapers if they polluted, plus the insurance requirements and equipment was not right in case of damage and the UFOC for Car Wash Guys did not cover these issues and those independent contractor contracts were10 years old. This was a major dilemma. So the team got together to make a set of training videos, upgrade equipment so that the team could keep the aviation customers and comply with the laws. Several of the franchisees with Car Wash Guys complied and kept washing Aircraft. It was determined that the market in aviation was not being satisfied so we have expanded into a full-blown franchise system. It was noticed that FBOs, Flying Schools and especially the fractional jet market was really taking off. This allowed the Car Wash Guys to sign Aircraft Wash Guys agreements or in some cases where they bought specialized equipment made verbal agreements for them to continue.

Then as we started get going the FTC hurt many of our franchisees by attacking Car Wash Guys and then the other terrorists of 9-11 just about put the death blow in General Aviation, but aviation people are tough as they come and today the market sector is rebounding. Lance often wondered who was worse the government terrorist regulator lawyers or the actual Osama Bin Laden and company?

Mr. Winslow has always been passionate about flying and aviation. His Father was a decorated naval Aviator flying in the Puerto Rico Squadron F-8s during Cuban Missile Crisis, 250 combat missions in an A-4, later CO of a Naval Squadron (A-7 Corsair II), later Captain in the Navy, later and Airline Pilot (737, 727, DC-10, 747, 777, 757), then after retirement, currently fly’s a Gulfstream Corporate Aircraft. Mr. Winslow’s dad wishes he could be flying F-18s in the Sand Box right now. Mr. Winslow’s Grandfather was head of FAA in Fresno International Airport and flew in a B-24, while his step grandfather flew a B-17 Flying Fortress) and his other grandfather built the first laser ring gyro now used as a guidance system throughout the aviation, marine and space industries. It is in my blood. Lance Winslow’s brother is a Pilot in Command for a C-130 in the US Marines stationed out of Miramar.

Today the Aircraft Wash Guys team has washed for Millionaire Aviation, Executive Jet, etc. And companies like Raytheon, Cessna and others. They have washed jets in Little Rock Arkansas, Scottsdale AZ Airpark, Colorado Springs CO, Bozeman MT, Columbus OH, Van Nuys CA, Palm Springs CA and many other airports across the country. The goals today include having 35 Aircraft Wash Guys in 2007 and 50 by 2009 and 100 by 2011. Ambitious, Big time, and can they do it? Well they think its possible, time will tell. They do have some competition in the Industry like any business, not much, but they plan on doing whatever it takes to be and stay leading edge.

If you study any service franchise in the United States or in the aviation sector any great company you will see they all came from the most humble beginnings, made mistakes along the way; had to battle with government regulators and competitors and press on to succeed. Of all the great names in aviation hanging up in the wall in museums across the country such as the Wichita Aviation Musuem, Wright Patterson Aviation Museum or even the Smithsonian you see the diehards that make this industry and this country great. Recently Burt Rutan made such a comment to Congress during his testimony on the birth of the private space industry. America is great but we must get out there and take a few risks if we want to stay on top.

An Aircraft Detailer’s Dream – No Bug Stick Wings

It seems like a thousand years ago when I started my first real business washing aircraft at age 12. It turned out to be a very astute business decision in hindsight. Still, as a 12-year old it was really hard work, and I can remember scrubbing the bugs off the leading edge and wings of small light aircraft and business jets. Then I’d have to wax them really good to help me get the new bugs off next time I washed the same aircraft.

That was then, and this is now and there may be relief on the way for future young aircraft cleaners. Let’s talk, let’s discuss some new future technologies in Aerospace.

There is a great video on YouTube talking about NASA wing research for modern aircraft. The title of the video is: “The Super-Efficient Future of Air Travel” and it is well worth watching. Fast forward the video to: 16:00 on the video.

This video discusses the drag, both induced drag and parasitic drag, from dead bugs and how this affects a wing’s performance, which is another reason why aircraft detailers are constantly washing and waxing the wings of aircraft.

Now then, just imagine in the future specialized coatings that prevent dead bugs (smushed ones) from sticking – wouldn’t that be a wonderful thing, yes, I agree totally. Wow, looking back, all I can say is; I sure wish they had such coatings back then, I’d have certainly saved myself so work, or would I have — maybe not, because if those coatings existed my aircraft washing, cleaning and detailing services may not have been needed.

Well, either way, these new technologies will be a complete game-changer for the Aircraft Detailing Industry, much like no-stick Teflon pans changed things for cooking bacon and eggs. Material Science has come a long way, and it is amazing just how much it will reshape the world we live in the future, even for those sub-sectors of our economy, things like aircraft washing and cleaning.

Sometimes I feel as if our industry doesn’t stay up on all the new technologies that affect us, and yes, it is a relatively simple business sector to participate in, nevertheless a prudent operator or owner of such a business needs to stay up with the leading edge of aerospace tech to stay ahead of the competition, thus, I thought you might like to hear about this. After all, we don’t want any of our workers getting carpal tunnel while scrubbing off all those obliterated and baked on bugs do we? Please consider all this and think on it.

Choosing the Right Mechanic for Your Aircraft

We all know that taking care of the mechanical health of your aircraft is step one in safety, but how do you know which type of airplane mechanic should work on your plane? Here’s a general overview of the types of aviation mechanics, according to FAA Safety Briefing, the FAA’s publication on GA news and information.

Choosing the type of airplane mechanic usually is connected to the work your aircraft needs. But often, you won’t know until the problem is diagnosed.

There are generally three types of airplane maintenance mechanics: airframe and powerplant mechanic (A&P), an inspection authorization endorsed mechanic (IA), or an FAA certificated repair station. Here’s an overview of who to go to and for what.

For general maintenance: Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic (A&P)

A&Ps, also known as aviation maintenance technicians, are usually called upon for routine aircraft maintenance, such as examining engines, conducting 100-hour inspections, replacing and repairing defective parts, repairing minor structural damage, and keeping corrosion under control.

To become a certificated A&P aircraft mechanic (14 CFR part 65), a person must be at least 18 years old, read, write, and speak English, and acquire 18 months of practical experience for either airframe or powerplant certification, or 30 months of practical experience concurrently for both airframe and powerplant.

One can also complete the training by attending an accredited part 147 maintenance school. Following training, the student must pass three tests – written, oral and practical – to become certified.

For aircraft inspections: Inspection Authorization Mechanic (IA)

An IA is essentially an FAA-licensed A&P mechanic with the additional endorsement of “inspection authority” issued on a FAA Form 8310-5 (IA card). As such, IAs are authorized to do progressive and annual aircraft inspections, in addition to a variety of maintenance and alterations than non-authorized A&Ps. The benefit of this is you can get your repair work done and sign-off paperwork done at the same time, saving time and money.

In addition to inspections, IAs can also sign for an aircraft’s return back to service after major repairs (Form 337), such as the repair or replacement of major control surfaces, spars, wing and tail surface brace struts, axle replacements, and major repairs to the powerplant.

To earn an IA designation, an A&P mechanic must train an additional three years (two years active), have available equipment and a fixed base of operations, pass an inspection-specific written test, and meet the requirements in 14 CFR part 65.91.

For large repairs: Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul Station (MRO)

If your aircraft is ever in need of major repairs on complex components, such as retractable landing gear assemblies, reciprocating and turbine engines, and auxiliary power units, the smart move may be an Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul Station (MRO), aka a repair station.

A good repair station with certified, experienced mechanics will have the specialized equipment and authorizations needed for complex repairs, such as avionics and electronics overhauls, mechanical actuators, fuel systems, and carburetors. Keep in mind that different stations might specialize in areas of aircraft maintenance, but all must adhere to the regulations and policies laid out in 14 CFR part 145.

To obtain a repair station certification, an applicant must successfully complete a five-stage process: pre-application, the formal application, document compliance, demonstration and inspection, and certification.

Reference:

http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/

An Aircraft Detailer’s Dream – No Bug Stick Wings

It seems like a thousand years ago when I started my first real business washing aircraft at age 12. It turned out to be a very astute business decision in hindsight. Still, as a 12-year old it was really hard work, and I can remember scrubbing the bugs off the leading edge and wings of small light aircraft and business jets. Then I’d have to wax them really good to help me get the new bugs off next time I washed the same aircraft.

That was then, and this is now and there may be relief on the way for future young aircraft cleaners. Let’s talk, let’s discuss some new future technologies in Aerospace.

There is a great video on YouTube talking about NASA wing research for modern aircraft. The title of the video is: “The Super-Efficient Future of Air Travel” and it is well worth watching. Fast forward the video to: 16:00 on the video.

This video discusses the drag, both induced drag and parasitic drag, from dead bugs and how this affects a wing’s performance, which is another reason why aircraft detailers are constantly washing and waxing the wings of aircraft.

Now then, just imagine in the future specialized coatings that prevent dead bugs (smushed ones) from sticking – wouldn’t that be a wonderful thing, yes, I agree totally. Wow, looking back, all I can say is; I sure wish they had such coatings back then, I’d have certainly saved myself so work, or would I have — maybe not, because if those coatings existed my aircraft washing, cleaning and detailing services may not have been needed.

Well, either way, these new technologies will be a complete game-changer for the Aircraft Detailing Industry, much like no-stick Teflon pans changed things for cooking bacon and eggs. Material Science has come a long way, and it is amazing just how much it will reshape the world we live in the future, even for those sub-sectors of our economy, things like aircraft washing and cleaning.

Sometimes I feel as if our industry doesn’t stay up on all the new technologies that affect us, and yes, it is a relatively simple business sector to participate in, nevertheless a prudent operator or owner of such a business needs to stay up with the leading edge of aerospace tech to stay ahead of the competition, thus, I thought you might like to hear about this. After all, we don’t want any of our workers getting carpal tunnel while scrubbing off all those obliterated and baked on bugs do we? Please consider all this and think on it.

Aircraft Management Services – You Need the Best

Not all aircraft management services are alike. While most will offer the basic services you will need, there are those who go a bit above and beyond the basics. Before deciding which company to use, find out all you can about them–and if they are able to provide what you want, instead of you having to settle for the standard services they offer. Remember, you have choices. And it is important to explore all of them before signing any agreements.

Things to Keep in Mind as You Search for an Aircraft Management Company

* How long has the company been in business? Startup companies can give you good rates, but they won’t have the experience you may require.

* What services other than the basics do they offer? Some extras will cost a bit more, but if they are important to you to have, it will be a good investment. Aircraft ownership is not inexpensive, to say the least, and pinching pennies when it comes to upkeep and other services makes no sense. Of course, you do want to make sure you are getting a fair rate.

* Make a list of the services and options you would like to have, along with a list of what you will not do without. This can help you narrow down the possibilities when deciding which company to use for your aircraft management needs.

* What are the qualifications of the staff they employ? All employees involved with your plane should be certified for whatever job it is they hold. Any company with less than complete professionals on their staff should not be used.

* What is their safety record? This is important, since the better the safety record, the safer your aircraft will be. Do a little digging and you will not regret it.

For the most part, the companies you are considering should have a record of their current and past clients, and what they have to say about the company in question. Ask for referrals before making your decision to be sure you will have the best experience possible.

Facilities and Services to Consider When Making Your Decision

* Heated hangar space

* Insurance against accident or other problems which may occur at competitive rates

* Supplemental or regular staffing availability such as flight crew that are fully trained and rated

* Dispatch services and flight schedule access for aircraft owners

There may be cases where you will want to make your aircraft available for charter services through the management company. Full accounting disclosure and the highest rate for aircraft owners would be necessary to look for in this endeavor. Choosing an aircraft management service that has fully qualified pilots and flight teams to run the charter flight can actually help to defray the costs of ownership of the aircraft.

Since the aircraft itself can be such a large initial investment, it only makes sense to protect that investment with the right aircraft management services for your needs. The corporate owned services may seem like the best option, but for flexibility in working with plane owners, a smaller, dependable company is the best bet.

Everything You Need to Know About Commercial Aircraft Passenger Services

Most large commercial airports deal with numerous challenges each day. Besides the runway traffic, efficient passenger traffic remains one of the major concerns. Commercial carriers need to handle their passenger traffic flow efficiently and economically. Typically, aircraft passenger services are offered either by commercial airlines directly or by airport management companies which work at an airport. In this post, we will examine more detail to understand these services better.

The basics

The process of check-in to departure at a commercial airport has evolved for every passenger and crewmember. Ensuring smooth coordination in this process is extremely critical, not only for the customers but also to allow airport and airline personnel to perform their essential duties. Commercial carriers coordinate with airport management staff and other service providers to streamline passenger flow. These services include:

– Keeping track and maintaining a flow of check-ins, arrivals, and departures. Besides check-ins, such services also include assistance for cancellations and changes in itineraries.

– Support crew and passengers for boarding and de-planning (if required).

– Assuring special help and support for disabled passengers.

– Helping minors, who are unaccompanied by adults or guardians

– Monitoring departure control systems

– Core services required by travelers, such as ticketing and sales at an airport.

– Offering additional assistance for other areas, such as charges for extra baggage.

– Arrival baggage services.

– Special services related to lost baggage.

– Assistance that might be needed additionally by customers in certain situations.

Aircraft passenger services are extremely relevant and necessary for smooth commercial airport operations.

Finding a service provider

The passenger service experience defines and determines the brands of commercial carriers, airport sponsors and management, and other stakeholders, and it’s important to choose an airport management company that understands the complicities and demands of this industry. If you need a professional management company or other on-airport service provider, you should diligence two areas:

1. First, the company should be experienced and must have the infrastructure and capabilities to handle the projects assigned to them. The professional service provider should be able to document a strong track record of proven results and offer references from this experience history.

2. Also, you should review the specific experience of the concerned company. Keep in mind that the concept of professional airport management is different in various parts of the world. Fixed Base Operators (FBOs) serving in this role are more customary in North America and Europe, while other geographical areas use different structures.

Passengers remain the lifeline of the aviation industry, and commercial service providers and airlines have to ensure efficient, value-based services for them. This also ensures smooth and efficient passenger flow at commercial airports.

Starting an Aircraft Washing Business

So you love airplanes and you want to start an aircraft washing service? I cannot blame you, as I did the same thing. After cleaning Thousands of aircraft over the years, I have paid for my flight school, first aircraft and then started an aircraft washing franchise as a module of another franchising company I had founded. Named the Aircraft Wash Guys we learned early on what it takes to satisfy aircraft owners, FBOs Fixed Based Operators and Chief Pilots. We always specialized in washing and polishing aircraft. We’ve cleaned thousands of private planes, corporate jets, flying clubs, flight schools and helicopters. My Car Wash Guys company was originally founded over twenty years ago and started as an aircraft washing service.

As you know, aviation people are serious about flying and a clean plane makes flying more fun and enjoyable. Corporate Aviators need you to maintain their positive image. When in the aircraft washing business you will not only wash exteriors of planes, you must also have carpet-cleaning capabilities. Many of our crewmembers are also private pilots and it pays to have pilots as part of your employee team. To learn more about aircraft washing, I have put some additional ideas online to assist you.

http://www.Aircraftwashguys.com/aircraftbbs

We have always kept our prices low and gone for volume, you may wish to do this or charge the going rate. Our rates are at the lower end of the spectrum and this will give you a good starting point on pricing.

Single Engines $20.00-45.00 wash, waxing $60.00-140.00, weekly wash $20.00;

Twin Engines $45.00-90.00 wash, waxing $90.00-240.00, weekly wash $40.00; Corporate Jets $90.00-140.00 wash, waxing $180.00-400.00, weekly wash $80.00;

Helicopters $30.00-100.00 wash, waxing $45.00-180.00, weekly wash $30.00. Carpet Shampooing, Bright Work and Aluminum Polishing, etc. generally we will give the customers free estimates.

You will need to perform these services the customer’s schedule and usually accommodate, immediate services, day or night, evenings and weekends. Customizing your services with the customer’s requirements must become your specialty. You will also need the following things:

Two Million in Liability Insurance

Quiet Machines and Professional Crews in Uniform

Monthly Invoice by “N”-Number

Water Reclamation Device Onboard, EPA Compliant

Truck or Trailer Mounted Unit, Fully Self Contained, Painted Safety Yellow

Owning an Aircraft Washing Service small business can be quite rewarding and although hard work, it can be an extension of your flying hobby. Just think getting paid to wash some of the latest and greatest aircraft and hanging out at the airport all day? And yes, they will even pay you very well for doing just that. Think on this.