Knowing The Relevance of Fixed Base Operators on Commercial Airports

For the uninitiated, FBO stands for Fixed Base Operator – a term that’s extremely relevant in both the general and commercial aviation sectors. The aviation industry is propelled by a number of companies and service providers, many of which are focused on helping different parties with vested interests. FBO basically cater to the needs of general aviation, and depending on their profile, they may work with commercial carriers and other individual companies that require on-airport services. In this post, we will talk about FBOs and how their services are important and pertinent for the sector.

The need for FBO

It is very hard to generalize the scope of work done by Fixed Base Operators, primary because their roles at different airports can vary tremendously. They are, however, extremely important to the aviation customers they serve. As mentioned, an FBO may choose to work with a regular commercial airline, or they might be involved in airport maintenance as approved by the airport sponsor along with the overseeing regulatory authority. FBOs are important because they provide a critical service, the supply of aviation fuels, at the airports they serve. Their services help in maintaining standards and services at an airport, and they can serve commercial carriers as well as the general aviation public. Many FBOs are described as full service, meaning they provide additional services such as Maintenance Repair and Overhaul (MRO) and Aircraft Charter and Management (ACM) in addition to the core FBO services of aircraft handling, fueling and hangaring. It largely depends on the nature of the airport and local demand for services.

Things to expect

FBOs serve in different roles. Almost all FBOs provide the core line services of aircraft handling, fueling and hangaring. Most also provide facilities with amenities for the flying public and flight crews, including general aviation terminals with customer service desks and seating areas, flight planning and pilot lounges and rest areas, and other amenities. When it comes to commercial services, FBOs at many regional airports will provide commercial handling and fueling where there is not enough commercial service to rise to the level of a stand-alone third party provider. Although somewhat less frequent, FBO personnel can also provide some above wing services such as passenger ticketing, check in and gate agent services.

Working with a FBO

If you are an airport sponsor or someone who needs assistance with airport businesses, you should be careful about how you choose the best FBO management service. Expertise and experience matter the most in this sector, given that the cost of operations is getting higher as demand for higher service levels and better facilities continues to increase. You need a team that knows your business goals and can offer dedicated assistance with complex aviation logistics. As a prospective client, you should carefully diligence their experience and capabilities, and you should always be able to contact their references. FBOs are great at overcoming operational challenges, but working with the right service provider who understands your needs and meets your expectations is critical.

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Everything You Need to Know About Commercial Aircraft Passenger Services

Most large commercial airports deal with numerous challenges each day. Besides the runway traffic, efficient passenger traffic remains one of the major concerns. Commercial carriers need to handle their passenger traffic flow efficiently and economically. Typically, aircraft passenger services are offered either by commercial airlines directly or by airport management companies which work at an airport. In this post, we will examine more detail to understand these services better.

The basics

The process of check-in to departure at a commercial airport has evolved for every passenger and crewmember. Ensuring smooth coordination in this process is extremely critical, not only for the customers but also to allow airport and airline personnel to perform their essential duties. Commercial carriers coordinate with airport management staff and other service providers to streamline passenger flow. These services include:

– Keeping track and maintaining a flow of check-ins, arrivals, and departures. Besides check-ins, such services also include assistance for cancellations and changes in itineraries.

– Support crew and passengers for boarding and de-planning (if required).

– Assuring special help and support for disabled passengers.

– Helping minors, who are unaccompanied by adults or guardians

– Monitoring departure control systems

– Core services required by travelers, such as ticketing and sales at an airport.

– Offering additional assistance for other areas, such as charges for extra baggage.

– Arrival baggage services.

– Special services related to lost baggage.

– Assistance that might be needed additionally by customers in certain situations.

Aircraft passenger services are extremely relevant and necessary for smooth commercial airport operations.

Finding a service provider

The passenger service experience defines and determines the brands of commercial carriers, airport sponsors and management, and other stakeholders, and it’s important to choose an airport management company that understands the complicities and demands of this industry. If you need a professional management company or other on-airport service provider, you should diligence two areas:

1. First, the company should be experienced and must have the infrastructure and capabilities to handle the projects assigned to them. The professional service provider should be able to document a strong track record of proven results and offer references from this experience history.

2. Also, you should review the specific experience of the concerned company. Keep in mind that the concept of professional airport management is different in various parts of the world. Fixed Base Operators (FBOs) serving in this role are more customary in North America and Europe, while other geographical areas use different structures.

Passengers remain the lifeline of the aviation industry, and commercial service providers and airlines have to ensure efficient, value-based services for them. This also ensures smooth and efficient passenger flow at commercial airports.