Private Jet Detailing And Aircraft Cleaning Entrepreneurs Have Good News For 2017

The general aviation sector has been in the doldrums for quite a while. Some blame this on increased FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) regulations, much of which occurred after 9-11 to protect airports from potential terrorists, unfortunately these increased security requirements and increased regulations have stifled the general aviation (GA) sector. The economic crashes of 2000 and 2008 didn’t help, although in 2003 the economy was flying high thanks to Bush Tax Cuts and stimulus, then it hit a wall again and didn’t really do well until the run-up just before the 2008 crash.

The GA sector has only slightly recovered since then but not back to its 2003 highs. When Obama got elected he railed against Corporate Jets and Corporate Fat Cats which hurt jet sales and new aircraft sales. Remember when congress went after the Auto Makers for flying their corporate jets to Washington DC to beg for bailouts? Public sentiment against GA was at an all-time low.

All of this had hurt aircraft cleaners and jet detailers – it made it tough to make money, but it looks like things are changing and the number of GA Aircraft is increasing. This new Trump Administration is pro-Aviation unlike the Obama Administration. Cutting corporate taxes will also help GA and jet sales. It looks like clear skies ahead for those in the General Aviation services business.

There was a great article in AIN – Aircraft International News – December Edition titled; “UBS Bizjet Index Sees Post-election Surge,” by Chad Trautvetter posted on December 12, 2016 which noted the following facts; The new Trump Administration in the U.S. is widely seen as a positive, with 61 percent of those surveyed expecting the outcome of the U.S. presidential election to ultimately be positive for the business jet market, while 11 percent don’t see a positive impact and 28 percent are uncertain.

In fact the article went on to note that there was an increase of between 44-49% increased orders for private jets over last year. Many of those aircraft will be delivered by 2018, and the backlog will increase used aircraft sales and current new inventory. More aircraft certainly means more aircraft to clean and more new aircraft means more corporate detailing customers as well. Meanwhile, along with the fractional jet market, we see jet air-taxi services on the increase as well as Uber style aircraft ride-sharing plans smaller companies can buy into. All of this means the GA sector is ready to take off again and that’s good for business.

Private Jet Sales Approach in a Tough 2019 Buyer’s Market – Working With Trusting & Trusted Partners

2019 became a Buyer’s market since 55 of the Worldwide 404 operational Hawker 800XPs were now available for sale, (representing 14% of the entire fleet), making this a challenging market for selling a Hawker 800XP or other similar pre-owned private jet aircraft.

Consulting brokers, like The Private Jet Company, stay in constant touch with both buyers and sellers over years to answer any questions or concerns related to the private aviation industry, aircraft price trends, private jet ownership and future interests and as a result became trusted advisors for any private aviation matters.

Early in the inspection process our expert inspectors found out that after placing the aircraft with its new operator, the owner dropped the top-tier engine and APU maintenance service plans that had conveyed with the aircraft upon purchase. We advised the estate that the lack of the APU and engine programs was a significant reduction in the aircraft’s value.

The estate agreed with our recommendation and decided to re-enroll the aircraft on the top-tier engine and APU maintenance service program.

Even though the owner only flew 100 hours in the two years since the engines and APU had been un-enrolled from the maintenance service plan programs, the engine manufacturer, Honeywell, required a full enrollment inspection and performance evaluation of the engines prior to acceptance into a new APU maintenance program.

Upon the recommendation of The Private Jet Company, the estate engaged Dallas Airmotive to perform the engine re-enrollment inspection, since they did the 2011 Midlife Inspections for these engines. Upon re-inspection, the engines were found to be in excellent condition and Honeywell agreed to re-enroll the engines. Based on our direct negotiation with Honeywell on the re-enrollment buy-in amount we were able to secure a substantial discount for the owner.

With the 20-Year inspection completed and the engines and APU now re-enrolled on the top-tier programs, we contacted potential buyers who inquired about the aircraft. One buyer offered the best terms and after some negotiations on behalf of the estate, a purchase agreement was executed. The new owner was a King Air operator in the Midwest buying the firm’s first jet.

The buyer agreed to accept the recent 20-year G Inspection as their Pre-Purchase Inspection and a smooth transaction was concluded by the delivery of a highly upgraded, freshly inspected and fully program enrolled Hawker 800XP. Both buyer and seller were fully satisfied with the transaction and its outcome.

7 Tips to Getting Over Your Fears Before Getting Your Private Pilot License

We all have fears. Some of us won’t even admit to them, but we have them. Embarking on anything new, while being very exciting, can also be very scary. The reason, the main reason…fear of failure. You need to get over your fears not only of flying, if you have one. but of failing as well before you can be the proud owner of a private pilot license.

If you’ve taken a driver’s test and didn’t pass the first time, you remember what that was like when the instructor turned to you and said, “Sorry, you failed.” If you looked up the word “down” in the dictionary, you would have seen a photo of yourself right next to the definition.

Nobody likes to fail, and fear of failure is one of the worst fears in the world.

Okay, great… now that we’ve established that… how do we deal with it?

Here are a few great ways of overcoming the fear of failure.

1. Consider The Missed Opportunity.

Imagine that you decide that you’re too afraid to go through with learning how to fly and taking your exam. Now imagine what life is going to be like without being able to do this very thing that you love so much. I’m assuming that if you want to learn how to fly, there is a big reason for it. Focus on that instead of the fear and this will go a long way to alleviating that fear.

2. Research The Alternatives

Imagine what you will have to do without your PPL. You’ll have to rely on commercial airlines. You won’t be able to go where you want to go WHEN you want to go there. You’ll be at the mercy of others. The alternatives to flying your own plane, if you don’t want to rely on commercial airlines, are driving, train, bus and even boat. If that thought makes you sick to your stomach, focus on it. That’ll get you over your fear of failure.

3. Put The Worst Case Scenario Into Perspective

Let’s say you fail your PPL exam? What’s the worst thing that can happen? They can’t tell you that you can’t take it again. You can still take another shot at it. It’s not like this is a one time offer. If that were the case, there would be a ton of people not driving or flying planes. It’s not the end of the world if you fail. At worse, you have to wait a little longer to get your PPL.

4. Understand The Benefits Of Failure

Believe it or not, you learn something from failure. You learn what it is you did wrong and get a chance to improve it. Would you rather that you didn’t fail your exam only because some instructor took pity on you and ended up getting yourself killed because you really weren’t ready to fly? I think you know the answer to that.

5. Make A Contingency Plan

If you do fail, have a plan. You should already be planning in advance on taking more lessons, getting more flight time and rescheduling. Failing doesn’t mean that you give up.

6. Take Action

The best way to get rid of that fear is to just go ahead and do it. The more you procrastinate, the more afraid you’re going to become until you reach a point where you’re unable to take your exam at all.

7. Burn Your Boats

In ancient times, Greeks would burn their boats so that they had no choice but to move forward. They couldn’t turn back. I don’t know what you have to do in order to burn YOUR boat but do it. If that means picking up the phone and scheduling your exam, do it. Don’t look back.

Hopefully, the 7 items I’ve gone over will help you get over your fears of getting your private pilot license

Tips and Tricks For Private Pilots – Check Ride Guides

Anytime one is completing a practical test in any subject the attitude of the examiner plays a part in how comfortable and confident you feel. Of course you are going to feel some form of intimidation, but make every effort to put this aside as it will interfere with your capabilities.

Completing your Private Pilot Check ride is a perfect example of the above scenario. This is your final practical test before achieving your Private Pilot License. You must remember that the examiner has a job to do. He/she must determine that you are knowledgeable enough and capable of flying a plane on your own. There is a standard form that the examiner must follow but some will add a few twists of their own to see how you react. They go a little beyond the classic textbook knowledge.

A favored trick of some examiners is the pencil fallacy. Here they will drop their pencil at some point of time during your flying. Most often, it will occur when you are engaged in performing a task that requires your undivided attention such as doing a turn. Your first instinct is to want to impress the examiner, so you will immediately try to retrieve the pencil taking your attention away from your maneuver. This act of kindness on your part could cause you the loss of the chance to obtain your license. In other word a failing mark. Be one-step ahead of these types of ploys. Keep extra pencils on your kneeboard. Then simply tell the examiner you cannot reach their pen as you must concentrate on what you are doing, but in fact, you do have an extra one.

Always be prepared for the unexpected. Dead batteries are one of the most common mishaps. Let’s assume you are being rerouted to another airport and your E6B that you rely so heavily on is suddenly flat. If you carry a good supply of extra batteries with you then there is not going to be a problem. If you don’t then you have to rely on the wheel that you have thought about since your initial training. Talk about extra stress this is it. The last thing you need is any more stress at this particular time.

There are not only instances where deviating from your concentration could be dangerous they could also be embarrassing. You can imagine how you would feel if you were in the take off mode only to discover that, you hadn’t removed the tie down rope? After all, isn’t this something you should have completed in your pre flight? The lesson to be learned here is taking nothing for granted and check everything.

The purpose of this test is to show you are capable of being the pilot in command. This includes viewing your examiner as your passenger. Ensure that your passenger has his seatbelt on. If you miss this simple step you could be missing your license. Don’t forget about the pre flight briefing that is to be given your passenger as well. You are ultimately responsible for the safety of your passenger regardless if he happens to be the examiner. Also, remember to do your break check at your takeoff. You have to show that you are considering the flight as a whole. You need to know that you can land.

You must always be prepared. This means that if the examiner were to tell you that an engine was out you would have to be prepared for an emergency landing. In this case, you need to be constantly aware of your surroundings and always know the possible places you could put your plane down safely if you had to do so.

These are just a few of the unforeseen circumstances your examiner could put in your path. Just be prepared for anything.